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Monday, May 7, 2012

Biscuits


Hi WEEC listeners!!  Here is a great recipe for Angel Biscuits.  I guess they are called this because they are HEAVENLY.  *grin*


ANGEL BISCUITS
2-1/2 tsp. dry yeast
1 tsp. salt

1/4 c. warm water
1 c. shortening

5 c. all purpose flour
2 c. buttermilk

1/4 c. sugar
1 T. baking powder



Dissolve yeast in warm water and set aside. Combine flour, sugar, baking powder,
and salt. 


Cut in shortening until it resembles cornmeal. Add yeast mixture and buttermilk to dry ingredients. Mix until ingredients are incorporated, but don't over beat. 


Turn out onto floured surface. Knead for 1 minute. Roll out dough to 3/4 inch
high and cut with biscuit cutter. 


Place onto cookie sheet and brush top with melted butter. Bake in 400° preheated oven for 15 minutes or until brown. Yield: 12-16 biscuits


Note: These are light and fluffy-somewhere between a roll and a true biscuit. Freeze
on a silicone lined cookie sheet until hard, then place in labeled Ziploc's. Fresh
biscuits are minutes away. Baking time increases a bit for frozen biscuits. A word
about silicone cookie sheet liners-they are great!! Get one...or two.



HIGH RISE BISCUITS
(a good basic biscuit)
4 c. all purpose flour
4 tsp. sugar

2 T. baking powder
2/3 c. unsalted butter, chilled

1 tsp. baking soda
1-1/2 c. buttermilk

1 tsp. salt butter, melted
Preheat oven to 450°. 
Sift the flour with the baking powder, baking soda, salt, and 
sugar in a large bowl.


Cut in the butter with a knife. Blend with a pastry blender until 
the texture of coarse crumbs. Stir in the buttermilk to form a soft dough. 





Knead 
briefly on a lightly floured board. Roll dough out 1-1/4 inches thick. Cut into 3 inch

rounds and arrange with sides touching.

Brush the tops with melted butter. Bake until
golden, about 20-25 minutes. Makes 8-9 large biscuits.

Note: The more you handle biscuit dough, the tougher it gets. A soft dough yields a
moister product. Freeze buttermilk for up to 3 months. It will separate as it thaws. Stir
well to remix the buttermilk, then measure for the recipe. It is perfectly good for
baking. I know you can sour milk with lemon juice as a buttermilk substitute, but I
like the real thing better.

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